Google shows job postings

  

Google shows job postings

 

They do say that Dr. Google knows it all, and now it even helps you find a new job. The search giant has launched a new feature that allows users to search relevant job postings and lists them in results. As you soon as you search for a job in the U.S. version of Google, you'll see such results immediately. you just need to search for “jobs near me” or something similar.
Users in the U.S. can search for a term like “teaching jobs” or “jobs in the area”, and Google will display listings from sites like Monster, LinkedIn, WayUp, DirectEmployers, Career Builder, Glassdoor and Facebook. The company provides a variety of filters to narrow down results by title, category, date posted and type.
After filtering down jobs by a number of different criteria, there will be reviews and ratings of the employer from trusted sites next to a description of the role. If job seekers are logged into their Google account, Google will also show you how long your commute would be from home, and allow searchers to turn on alerts to receive email notifications when new jobs become available.
Before creating this job list, Google has to remove all the duplicate listings that employers post to all these job sites. Google will link you to the one with the most complete job posting. Then, its machine learning-trained algorithms sift through and categorize them. The search results use a form of artificial intelligence that categorizes and lists the job postings from all the different sites. Once jobs match your profile and you choose one, Google will direct you to the job site to start the actual application process. “We hope this will act as an incentive for sites to share all the pertinent details in their listings for job seekers,” said a Google spokesperson.
As to the job application process, Google doesn't involve itself in the process itself. The application process is handled by the website Google directed you to.
"With this new experience, we aim to connect Americans to job opportunities across the U.S., so no matter who you are or what kind of job you're looking for, you can find job postings that match your needs," said Nick Zakrasek, product manager at Google.
This new capability places Google in competition with Indeed.com, which is a popular search engine - with over 200 million unique visitors each month - that compiles job postings from different websites. Whether it poses a threat to Indeed.com, it is obvious it doesn't threaten other websites that match the job postings with the searcher's experience. LinkedIn and WayUp, for instance, suggest positions that matches the user's profile.
Rather than a competitor, this project is about collaboration. LinkedIn, Monster, WayUp, DirectEmployers, CareerBuilder, Glassdoor and Facebook are some of the partners Google is working on for this project. The search giant has helped websites by instructing them on how to make sure that their job posts come up in Google.
This new search results are part of the “Google for Jobs” initiative at the company, aimed at matching job seekers with employers. Although they do provide a service to job seekers, the search giant is not trying to compete with websites like Monster or LinkedIn as it has no intention of letting employers directly post job openings on its search engine, according to an interview Nick Zakrasek - Google's product manager for this product - gave to TechCrunch. “We (Google) want to do what we do best: search. We want the players in the ecosystem to be more successful,” said Zakrasek. Anything beyond that is not within Google's scope of action, he added.
In the interview, Zakrasek said: “Finding a job is like dating. Each person has a unique set of preferences and it only takes one person to fill this job.”
Google's statements were backed up by Monster.com's CTO Conal Thompson, when asked how this cooperation with Google will change the competitive landscape for job sites. “Google's new job search product aligns with our core strategy and will allow candidates to explore jobs from across the web and refine search criteria to meet their unique needs,” he wrote. “Yes, as with anything, there will be some challenges and adjustments to existing job posting sites; the biggest perhaps being for those that are currently driven by SEO.”

 

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